Kagan Cooperative Learning Chapter 1

Frequent Questions

(Excerpt from the New Kagan Cooperative Learning™ Book)

References

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Kagan, S. “Group Grades Miss the Mark.” Cooperative Learning and College Teaching, 1995, 6(1): 5–8.

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7

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10

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12

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13

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14

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15

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16

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17

Johnson, D. & R. Johnson. “Students’ Perceptions of and Preferences for Cooperative and Competitive Learning Experiences.” Perceptual and Motor Skills, 1979, 42: 989–990.

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22

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23

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24

Friedman, T. The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Globalized World in the Twenty-first Century. London, England: Allen Lane, 2005.

25

Discussion Board. San Clemente, CA: Kagan Publishing. http://www.KaganOnline.com