Kagan strategies and GT students

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lstrothe
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:30 am

Kagan strategies and GT students

Post by lstrothe » Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:42 am

Several of the teachers from our school are attending the Accelerating Achievement workshop in Arlington in March. We are wondering how the Kagan strategies relate to our GT (Gifted and Talented) students. Is there any information that you can provide regarding this topic?

krisosthoff
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 11:17 am

Re: Kagan strategies and GT students

Post by krisosthoff » Wed Mar 04, 2015 3:47 pm

Hi lstrothe,
I just wanted you to know that I have seen your question, and I'm working on it. I'm fairly confident we have literature or an article that will benefit you and your colleagues. I know first hand that structures benefited my gifted and talented students, but I understand that your district needs documentation.
I noticed a question very similar to this was also posted in the Implementation and Theory section. I will post what I can recommend on this thread. I'll be in touch.
All the best,
Kris

krisosthoff
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 11:17 am

Re: Kagan strategies and GT students

Post by krisosthoff » Thu Mar 05, 2015 6:10 am

Hi lstrothe,
Please email me at kriso@kaganonline.com so I can email you some items.
Thanks!
Kris Osthoff

JGCHCS
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2020 6:39 am

Re: Kagan strategies and GT students

Post by JGCHCS » Thu Jun 25, 2020 6:45 am

Hi,

I am curious about this myself. What about the students who may be gifted but are yet unidentified? Or those who, for whatever reason (such as being 2e and needing co-taught math) don't make it into a GT/Honors class? Research shows that grouping these students with peers not like themselves may do extensive socio-emotional harm, causing neurotic perfectionism, alienation, etc. These students should not be grouped in the typical Kagan 1 high-2 middle - 1 low form. What do you suggest here?

Here is an article that discusses socio-emotional harm in GT adolescents, one of many I have found discussing this.

Bullying and the Unique Socioemotional Needs of Gifted and Talented Early Adolescents: Veteran Teacher Perspectives and Practices
https://doi.org/10.1080/02783193.2017.1362678

Tom Searl
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:34 am

Re: Kagan strategies and GT students

Post by Tom Searl » Fri Jun 26, 2020 9:18 am

Hello -

You know your students best and will be able to determine which pairs/groups to place your students. If you feel students need exposure to working with others, of different levels, then do it. If you feel students need exposure to working with those similar to them, then this is also good. We know that we want all students to be able to work with others and be able to not only practice their academic skills, but to also practice their social skills (patience, taking turns, listening to a different perspective, etc ...).

One of the best things we can do for students is to involve them in classbuilding and teambuilding structures. If you have Dr. Kagan's Cooperative learning book, on Chapter 6, page 24, he lists out all of the structures and their different purposes (functions). Two of the ten are labeled Classbuilding and Teambuilding. To help create the 'will' for students to 'want to' work together, they need to know one another. These structures are fantastic to develop relationships and exposing students to working with everyone in the room. We often tell kids that they 'don't have to be best friends, but they need to know how to get along with one another'. Classbuilding structures provide multiple opportunities for students to work with others. We slowly build a class community of active learners through Classbuilding.

Teambuilding structures also allow students to know one another within their teams. We can't expect students to talk, and feel comfortable talking about content, if they don't know the people seated around them. Teambuilding structures allow for students to get to know each other as people, with their own talents, interests, and uniqueness.

All of the other functions listed and described on page 6.24 are great for when you want students to talk about their academics and their learning. Depending upon the type of question you give to students, will determine the type of structure you would use. It then becomes the decision of the teacher, with whom students will speak.

Hoping this helps and a sincere thank you for all that you do for kids!

Tom