US History

Questions or discussion about Kagan theory, research, or implementing Kagan in your classroom.
nabezi
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:06 pm

US History

Post by nabezi » Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:37 pm

I am new to Kagan. I have attended the first two days of training. My question is with regard to implemetation. During the trainings I see and hear plenty of examples of how to implement the structures with LA, but what about history? I am looking for specific suggestions on structures and topics. For example, when teaching "How a Bill Becomes a Law" I understand I can use a structure, but what structure would best fit this topic? I plan on using Quiz, Quiz, Trade to do some vocabulary review, but what are some other ideas?

Elia Chesnoff
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 5:35 pm

Re: US History

Post by Elia Chesnoff » Fri Jan 17, 2014 5:40 am

One of the more challenging pieces of implementation is choosing the right structure for the content. On Day 2 of Cooperative Learning we discuss the functions. You can also refer to the Cooperative Learning textbook on page 6.24. Yes, Quiz Quiz Trade is great for reviewing vocabulary words. However, what if you want to add a higher order thinking question into the mix. If that's the case, I recommend using Timed-Pair-Share or Think-Write-RoundRobin. When I used to teach history, I enjoyed the Think-Write-Robin because it allowed for me to also insert a writing segment into the lesson. Students also benefited because they writing process allowed them to further sort out their thinking. Specifically, if you wanted students to review the process of how a bill becomes a law, I would try to break it up into four steps so students could share in a Single-RoundRobin.

Rob
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:37 am

Re: US History

Post by Rob » Mon Jun 02, 2014 7:35 pm

Remember from your Day Two training, you were also introduced to Fan-N-Pick. This structure works for your vocabulary review, but will also be great for your students to follow the procedure of a bill becoming a law. Your questions might include, "Who can introduce a bill?" or "What happens if the bill is vetoed?"