Sharing Kagan with Parents

Questions or discussion about Kagan theory, research, or implementing Kagan in your classroom.
a226
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:22 am

Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by a226 » Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:30 am

I am going to be giving a presentation about Kagan at an upcoming parent night. The administration would like me to include information about the research behind Kagan Cooperative Learning, examples of structures, and possibly how parents can use/adapt the structures for use at home. The first two areas I feel very comfortable with but if anyone has any suggestions about how I can make a Kagan school-home connection, that would be great!

rachel.treaster
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:59 pm

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by rachel.treaster » Sat Oct 19, 2013 3:28 pm

What a great opportunity to share what's happening in your classrooms with parents. We can share several ideas with you. It would be very helpful to know what days of training you have experienced so we can give you specific examples from the tools you've been taught and are using. I can't wait to hear more! ;) Rachel

angelapink
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 10:21 am
Location: Dallas, Texas

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by angelapink » Sat Oct 19, 2013 3:57 pm

I have heard teachers tell me, who are also parents, that they do RallyCoach with their children at home to homework. This would depend on the grade level, but I thought it was a great idea for elementary students where usually homework is for practice, not a grade.

Also, one of the best ways to share structures with these parents is to let them actually experience the structure. During curriculum night, I always had my parents sit in their child's seat and do the structure Fan-N-Pick. I had questions on the cards like, "What are you most excited about your child learning this year in first grade?" "What activities are you looking forward to this school year?" "What is a strength of your child?"

One more thing, pull out your Cooperative Learning book and look at Chapter 4. I think it's page 4:11 (but could be off) is the picture of the brain (PET scans). There are four snap shots, the fourth graphic is "your brain on structures". I always shared this picture with parents to demonstrate WHY we use structures. Usually parents worry about their child doing all the work, and/or getting a bad grade based on what someone else does in the group. These are two concerns you can alleviate during your meeting. We do not believe in group grades. We will only grade what they do individually after the group activity.

It would help us to better meet your needs if we knew more about your background in training, as well as what grade levels you are covering in your meeting. But hopefully these are some starting thoughts and ideas for you! Good luck!

Angela

rachel.treaster
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:59 pm

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by rachel.treaster » Sat Oct 19, 2013 4:54 pm

One of the most common things parents ask their children is, "How was your day?" Could you suggest parents use a Rally or Round Robin with their children about all the things they did that day? This could occur in the car on the way home or even around the dinner table. "What was the best part of your day?" Parents and children can answer this using a Round Robin and everyone shares! Good luck! ;)Rachel

Rob
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 8:37 am

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by Rob » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:59 am

I really like what Angela and Rachel said, it reminded me of something that the first family does each evening that they have the opportunity to be together for dinner.

The Obama’s have a family tradition that you may want to adopt at your house.
At dinner, they play a game called "Roses and Thorns." Everyone takes a turn describing a good thing that happened that day (rose) and a low moment or tough problem they had to deal with (thorn). It is nothing more than a RoundRobin.
When the President finished his turn after a particularly challenging day at the White House (we didn’t learn which one), Malia told her Dad: "You have a really thorny job."
Smart girl!

a226
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:22 am

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by a226 » Mon Oct 28, 2013 2:58 am

THANK YOU! You guys are awesome! These are all great suggestions. I went to the 4 day (maybe it was 5 day?) Cooperative Learning Workshop in Fairbanks, Alaska. Four years later, I am teaching at a school on a military base in Japan! I'm so excited to continue using the great things I learned from Christy at my first Kagan workshop! I'm looking forward to putting all of your excellent ideas together for my presentation! :-) Keep the suggestions coming!

rachel.treaster
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:59 pm

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by rachel.treaster » Thu Feb 06, 2014 7:36 am

I had another suggestion come to me about sharing Cooperative Learning with parents. Dr. Kagan has writen a Cooperative Laerning Mini book. It is a great resource, as in include descriptions of several structures, explains Cooperative Learning, has recent data, and much more!! As a trainer, I have received great feedback from this book and how easy it is to share with parents. I hope this helps.

Carol Lohkamp
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:38 am

Re: Sharing Kagan with Parents

Post by Carol Lohkamp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:50 am

Rachel, I agree with you completely about Dr. Kagan's mini-book! It is such a handy resource to help someone who is unfamiliar with cooperative learning get a basic overview of the research, theory, application and outcomes associated with Kagan structures for active engagement ... in about 30 minutes of reading time. I think it is so useful, I have given several copies as gifts to my friends who are school administrators!

To a226, good luck and best wishes!!