Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Questions or discussion about Kagan theory, research, or implementing Kagan in your classroom.
kimberly.daigre
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 16, 2015 7:31 am

Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by kimberly.daigre » Mon Mar 16, 2015 7:42 am

I attended a one day training on Win Win Discipline over the weekend as was very impressed and intrigued by the material covered. I am hoping to get the opportunity to attend a week long training someday because I am interested in a more in-depth look at the strategies. I am wondering if there has been any research done with Win Win Discipline in an Emotionally Disturbed and Behavior Disorder classroom. I have students who fall into 3 of the four behaviors and their positions change throughout the day. Has anyone had any success or are their any tips that can be shared in the implementation of Win Win in the EBD setting?

Kim

krisosthoff
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 11:17 am

Re: Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by krisosthoff » Mon Mar 16, 2015 5:24 pm

Hi Kim,
Thanks for you question. Let me look into this.
Kris Osthoff

rickduvall
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2013 8:41 am

Re: Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by rickduvall » Tue Mar 17, 2015 3:32 pm

Kim:

I'm thrilled that you're deeply reflecting on best implementation ideas for your special-needs students! Your students are EXACTLY the type of young people for whom Win-Win was created! Remember, through implementing Win-Win, we can more effectively eliminate and end disruptions -- but the ultimate goal is to convert those disruptions into opportunities to teach the disruptive student more responsible behaviors (immediately for the class and, ultimately, for life!).

First and foremost, definitely strive to attend a five-day Win-Win Discipline training. You will get to experience all 20 of the moment-of-disruption structures (rather than just the two that we experienced in our one-day training), all six of the progressive follow-ups (rather than just the one that we experienced in our workshop), and you'll go much deeper on responding to and preventing the ABCD behaviors and the seven positions that drive those behaviors through practice and reflection.

In the meantime, make sure that you check out Chapter 17 in your Win-Win Discipline textbook that you received. It is all about Win-Win for Students with Special Needs. I would urge you to pay special attention to the four adaptations and the three modifications that are described on p. 17.18. Also, remember the vital importance of Classbuilding and Teambuilding (p. 17.22) to help your students feel safe and included.

I also recommend that you study Chapter 12 carefully. In our one-day training, we only did a little practice of validating students' positions. I find that taking time to read this chapter and reflecting on its content helps us better internalize those basic human needs that we all have. Thus, we become more empathetic and understanding of our students, which tends to help reinforce the three pillars of Win-Win.

Best wishes -- and keep believing in your students! They are extremely blessed to have such a compassionate teacher like you in their lives!

kimberly.daigre
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Mar 16, 2015 7:31 am

Re: Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by kimberly.daigre » Wed Mar 18, 2015 6:11 am

Rick,

I attended your workshop last Saturday at Sterlington Elementary. I learned a great deal in just that one workshop, but know that the five day would beneficial. I have begun using Language of Choice with some of my disengaged students, and have been successful. I am interested in the coupon strategy, and plan to do more research this weekend. Thanks for the information!!

Kim

rwoodard
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2015 6:02 am

Re: Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by rwoodard » Thu Jun 04, 2015 6:15 am

I registered for this site because our evaluators keep pushing Kagan as a panacea for everything. In my Title I EBD setting, the information provided to me does not work. Prior to being a teacher, I was a mediator and am well familiar with the concept and strategies of Win-Win but our Kagan instruction does not address this. Instead there is an inherent bias towards EBD teachers that do not extensively use strategies that have repeatedly failed.

The bottom line is I get good results but believe that not relying on the Kagan model hurts us professionally based on observational bias towards Kagan. So I'm looking for information on how to not depend upon outside trainings to get strategies that directly apply to what I actually do.

Any help or resources would be appreciated.

rickduvall
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2013 8:41 am

Re: Implementing Win Win Discipline in an EBD Classroom

Post by rickduvall » Wed Jun 10, 2015 7:20 pm

It definitely sounds like you are in a stressful situation, being told to implement something with which you do not feel confident. Congratulations on getting good results with your special needs students. Children with diagnosed biophysical, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, and/or ecological challenges certainly are blessed to have a dedicated, passionate professional like yourself in their lives! Bless you! I think we, along with all other professionals, know that we can always learn more ways to improve upon our practices. It's so saddening to think that your school evaluators, in their zest for improving the learning lives of students, have seemingly failed in recognizing your strengths and what you're bringing to your students, as you say you are getting good results in actively engaging your students in their learning -- which is also the goal of Kagan Structures for Cooperative Learning and Active Engagement.

Can you provide more information so we can hopefully offer helpful advice? When you say that you are familiar with the concept and strategies of Win-Win, but the Kagan instruction that you have received doesn't address it, what do you mean exactly? Which days of Kagan training have you experienced? Has your training been led by a nationally certified Kagan trainer, or has someone mandated something without providing you quality training? If you have been to a Kagan workshop, is the Kagan instruction focusing on Cooperative Learning, Win-Win Discipline, or one of the other nearly 30 workshops that Kagan Professional Development offers? If it's Kagan Cooperative Learning, Kagan Win-Win Discipline should be addressed a bit during your Day 3 training when you explore how active engagement through Kagan Structures for Cooperative Learning and Active Engagement have a solid research base that shows that the overwhelming majority of disruptive behaviors can be reduced or eliminated by actively engaging students in their learning. Some disruptions need additional interventions through the explicit teaching of social skills (a heavy focus of Day 3). Even with active engagement in learning and social skills development, a very small percentage of students (quite likely your students with emotional and behavioral disorders) will need the additional intervention of Win-Win Discipline where we help foster autonomous responsibility in our students, so that we prevent future disruptions in the classroom and empower our students for a lifetime. If you are able to participate in a five-day Win-Win Discipline workshop, I believe that you'll find some powerful strategies and Win-Win structures to help you enhance the safe, comfortable learning environment that I'm sure you establish for yourself and your students. Of course, students with special needs, like all students, may engage in any of the four categories of disruptive behaviors (ABCD) and, at different times, may be in any of the seven positions that drive those behaviors. Do you know if the evaluators you mentioned have been trained in Kagan Win-Win Discipline? If so, you might remind them (if you feel you have a safe relationship with them) that when we formulate our responses by seeing and relating to the position of the student, we will be far more successful.

If your Kagan training has consisted of Kagan Cooperative Learning, I'm assuming that the information has contained the seven keys to making cooperative learning work. Which keys are working for you? Which keys are you finding need strengthening with your students? Is this the "Kagan model" you're referring to? I suggest having a conversation with your evaluators, and share with them the evidence of the keys that are working successfully in your classroom. There really isn't a Kagan model, other than seven keys for student engagement, that I know of. I would love to know what specifically the evaluators are looking for, and what kinds of observational bias their evaluation instruments hold? Has your school district created a "walk-through" protocol that is looking for specific components of Kagan cooperative learning? If so, what are those components?

Have you had a Kagan coach work in your classroom? They should be able to give you some very specific, concrete ideas for successfully implementing Kagan structures with your specific students and your content. You might ask your evaluators if they can provide this support to you since they are holding you accountable for successfully implementing Kagan structures (this is just an assumption, based upon what you said; please feel free to clarify).

I hope you get a chance to let us know some more specific information so that we can better support you. In the meantime, strive to continue creating a safe, happy learning environment for yourself and your students -- a place where you don't feel stressed at the end of the day and where your students are excited to come!